Drumlin Security’s Javelin PDF Reader isn’t the most well known PDF reader, but is a good simple and lightweight app for viewing PDFs on multiple platforms. While Javelin PDF Reader doesn’t offer much beyond just viewing PDFs, it does have a few useful extra features like filling forms and making bookmarks. It’s also designed for viewing special encrypted PDF files created by Drumlin Security’s software.


Pros

  • Very lightweight and small install size
  • Has a simple and easy to use interface
  • Available for free on both desktop and mobile platforms
Cons

  • Lacks some features that other free PDF readers have
  • Some users report issues with both the mobile app versions; crashing or not opening at all

What Javelin PDF Reader does best

For simply viewing and printing PDFs with little in the way of extra features and options, Javelin PDF Reader is a good choice. Probably what sets it apart from other readers the most is that it’s both lightweight and simple to use. The Windows version is only a little over 31 MB when installed and the other versions are comparably small in size. This is good for users who have limited drive space on their system.

When opening a PDF file in Javelin PDF Reader you’ll see a fairly intuitive and uncluttered toolbar at the top which provides most of the functions you would need while viewing a PDF, such as page navigation, zooming and panning.

As mentioned before, Javelin PDF Reader is also fairly unique in being able to read encrypted PDFs. Specifically, .drmz and .drmx files, which can be created with the separate Drumlin Publisher software.

Features of Javelin

When it comes to just viewing PDFs, there are a few different zoom modes; like actual size, fit page width and fit page height. There’s also a pan tool for moving documents around while zoomed in. In the bottom left is a small toolbar with additional page navigation, page layout options and a zoom tool that you can fine tune by percentage.

There’s a search tool for finding specific text in a document and a text selecting tool for copying it. The highlighter tool lets you highlight text in yellow, while the sticky notes tool can be used to add annotations or comments to specific spots on a page.

You can also use Javelin PDF Reader to fill in forms on PDFs and of course save and print them. There is not a tool for adding signatures to documents, however.

Pricing

The consumer version of Javelin PDF reader itself is completely free in all of its versions. There are however subscription services mainly aimed at publishers for adding DRM (Digital Rights Management) in the form of authorization codes for their PDF files. These plans start at $990/year, or $99/month and up based on the amount of codes needed.

What users have to say about Javelin PDF Reader

People have mostly positive things to say about Javelin PDF Reader, mainly about how the simple interface makes it easy to use and that it’s nice to have such a small and lightweight program for viewing PDFs.

Many mobile users for both Android and iOS say that it’s simple and easy to use as well. However, the ratings for the mobile apps are not too great on either platform’s app store, being just under 3 stars for both of them.

The most common complaints on iOS seem to be position and changes not being saved as well as performance issues. On Android, several users have said the app has stopped working and crashed or even refused to open at all for them. However, some users having issues have also said that support is responsive and helpful.

Software details

Javelin PDF Reader is available for Windows 7, 8 and 10 as well as for macOS/OSX from versions 10.6 to 10.10. For mobile versions it’s available for devices running Android 5.0 and later and iOS 9.3 and later for both iPhone and iPad.

Bottom line

While it’s not the most feature packed PDF reader and has some potential issues, Javelin PDF reader is great for just viewing PDFs in a lightweight and easy to use piece of free software.

Our score: ★★★★☆ 3.5/5 

About The Author

Ryder Lund

Since he was young Ryder has been drawn to technology and had a knack for working with and learning about it. He often ends up being tech support for friends and family because of this, so it feels natural to him to help out others by writing guides on how to use it. He enjoys living in the Pacific Northwest where he is close to both nature and the bustling tech hub of the Seattle area.